When your provider needs to take a deeper look beyond what’s visible to the human eye, you may be scheduled for an imaging test. It could be a standard x-ray or a more specialized exam, like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), or ultrasound, used to examine the internal structure of the body.

WVU Medicine performs a wide range of imaging tests for adult and pediatric patients in a comfortable, private environment. We perform MRI services for approximately 19,000 patients per year, including neurology, musculoskeletal, breast, cardiac, and pediatric health conditions.

We are the only site in West Virginia to have three of the most advanced 640-slice CT scanners in the industry, which allows us to capture clear images of most organs, like the heart and brain, in seconds. With our precise, high-resolution imaging, including expert interpretation of medical images, we work collaboratively with your care team to provide more accurate diagnosis and treatment for many complex and common conditions.

WVU Medicine is recognized for the highest level of imaging quality and patient safety by the American College of Radiology in computed tomography, mammography, nuclear medicine, and ultrasound. Our caring, knowledgeable, and experienced technologists are all board and state certified experts in their fields.

Imaging We Offer

WVU Medicine Imaging Services performs a variety of tests to examine internal organs, cells, or tissues where there might be a potential health concern. Our imaging capabilities include:

Evaluation and Treatment

Our team of board-certified radiologists, advanced practice professionals, nurses, and technologists perform and evaluate your radiological tests, and a radiologist consults with your referring provider to discuss your case and ensure complete, comprehensive care. Your provider will contact you to discuss your imaging results.

Advanced imaging at WVU Medicine helps our providers develop effective treatment plans and perform a wide range of complex procedures with more accuracy, including:

WVU Medicine Imaging Services provides 24-hour coverage and service to support the Jon Michael Moore Trauma Center and the WVU Stroke Center. In addition to the services offered at J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital, imaging services are available at other convenient WVU Medicine locations close to home, including WVU Medicine University Towne Centre in Morgantown and WVU Medicine outpatient clinics in Fairmont and Waynesburg.

Appointments and Directions

855-WVU-CARE 855-988-2273
1 Medical Center Drive
Morgantown, WV 26506

Clinic Number

304-598-4253

Clinic Hours

Monday – Friday
8 am – 5 pm

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WVU Medicine Imaging Services physicians and technologists are committed to providing you with the highest quality computerized tomography (CT) images in a safe, supportive environment. A CT scan uses computer processing and radiation to visualize nearly all parts of the body to diagnose and monitor disease, identify injury, and provide surgical guidance.

WVU Medicine is the only site in the state to have three of the most advanced 640-slice volume CT scanners in the industry, providing high-resolution imaging for patients of all ages and body types. With the latest advanced imaging technology, WVU Medicine radiologists are also able to combine a CT scan with positron emission tomography (PET) for a PET/CT scan, which provides more accurate diagnosis without two scans being performed separately.

WVU Medicine is recognized for the highest level of image quality and patient safety by the American College of Radiology in computed tomography. Our caring, knowledgeable, and experienced technologists are all board and state certified experts in their fields.

Imaging We Offer

WVU Medicine Imaging Services provides routine abdominal, brain, chest, neck, skeletal, and spine imaging and a variety of specialty imaging exams, including:

  • CT angiography (imaging of arteries that supply blood to the heart)
  • Calcium scoring
  • CT-guided biopsies
  • Enterography (imaging of small intestine)
  • 4D parathyroid CT (identifies abnormal parathyroid glands)
  • 4D CT for Gamma Knife preparation
  • Lung cancer screening
  • Pediatric CT exams
  • PET/CT scan
  • Stroke perfusion (imaging of blood flow to the brain)
  • Venogram (imaging of the leg veins)
  • Virtual colonography (large intestine imaging)

What to Expect

Before your CT scan, you may need to remove any metal objects, like jewelry, eyeglasses, or dentures that could interfere with the clarity of the images. Ask your doctor about any preparation or other questions you might have before your imaging test.

Some CT scans require a special dye called contrast material to help highlight the blood vessels and internal structures of the body. You may receive contrast material by mouth (for esophagus or stomach imaging), by injection (for gallbladder, urinary tract, or liver imaging), or by enema (for intestinal imaging). It can take up to an hour for contrast material to distribute throughout the body before your imaging test can begin.

During the test, you lie down on a padded table that slides into a donut-shaped machine, which is open on both sides. A technologist in a separate room will be able to see and hear you at all times. You may be asked to hold your breath for a brief period at certain times to avoid any possible blurring of the images. A CT scan can take anywhere from five minutes to thirty minutes or longer depending on the part of the body that is being tested and the number of images that are needed.

Once the CT exam is completed, the images are reviewed by a board-certified radiologist, and the radiologist will send your doctor a report. Your doctor will notify you with the results. To communicate easily and securely with your WVU Medicine provider, sign up for our free patient portal, MyWVUChart.

Appointments and Directions

855-WVU-CARE 855-988-2273

WVU Medicine Radiology
1 Medical Center Drive
Morgantown, WV 26506

WVU Medicine Radiology
6040 University Town Centre Drive
University Town Centre
Morgantown, WV 26501

Clinic Number

304-598-4253

Insurance pre-authorization is required before a CT scan can be scheduled.

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Ultrasound (sonography) is an imaging test that uses high-frequency sound waves to provide images of soft tissue and internal organs without the use of radiation.

WVU Medicine Imaging Services uses the most advanced equipment in the industry to perform 3D and 4D ultrasound imaging, conducting about 20,000 exams a year for a wide range of conditions including pediatric, breast, high-risk obstetrics, and vascular issues.

WVU Medicine is recognized for the highest level of image quality and patient safety by the American College of Radiology in ultrasound. Our caring, knowledgeable, and experienced technologists are all board and state certified experts in their fields.

Imaging We Offer

WVU Medicine Imaging Services uses ultrasound to help diagnose and guide treatment for many medical issues. We perform several types of ultrasound exams, including:

Abdomen

  • Bladder
  • Gallbladder
  • Kidneys
  • Liver
  • Pancreas
  • Spleen

OB/GYN

  • Fetal assessments
  • Uterus and ovaries (transvaginal)

Pediatric

  • Neonatal head
  • Pyloric stenosis
  • Spine

Small parts

  • Neck
  • Scrotum
  • Thyroid

What to Expect

An external ultrasound uses a small probe called a transducer that is place on the skin along with a gel-like substance. The image from the probe is displayed on a monitor while the scan is performed. Some ultrasounds, like pelvic or vaginal, require a small probe to be inserted into the body. Most ultrasounds last only a few minutes while others may take about 15 to 45 minutes, depending on the part of the body being examined.

Once your ultrasound is complete, the images will be reviewed by a board-certified radiologist. Your doctor will receive an electronic copy of the imaging report and notify you with the results. To communicate easily and securely with your WVU Medicine provider, sign up for our free patient portal, MyWVUChart.

Appointments and Directions

855-WVU-CARE 855-988-2273

J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital

1 Medical Center Drive
Morgantown, WV 26506

University Town Centre
6040 University Town Centre Drive
Morgantown, WV 26501

Physician Office Center
1 Medical Center Drive
Morgantown, WV 26506

Cheat Lake
608 Cheat Road
Morgantown, WV 26508

Fairmont Outpatient Clinic
100 Stoney Hill Road
Fairmont, WV 26554

Clinic Number

304-598-4253

A mammogram is an x-ray image of breast tissue that can help screen for breast cancer. WVU Medicine uses the most advanced mammography equipment to provide you with high-quality, 3D images using low-dose radiation during the imaging process.

Routine screening mammograms play a critical role in the early detection of breast cancer and providing improved outcomes for patients. Talk to your doctor about recommendations for when you need to receive a mammogram. Based on your risk factors and medical history, your mammogram screening recommendations may differ.

WVU Medicine is recognized for the highest level of imaging quality and patient safety by the American College of Radiology in mammography. Our caring, knowledgeable, and experienced radiologists and technologists are all board and state certified experts in their fields.

Imaging We Offer

  • Breast MRI
  • Breast scan
  • Breast ultrasound
  • Bone density scan along with screening mammogram
  • Diagnostic mammography (for patients with a new breast abnormality)
  • Mobile mammography with Bonnie’s Bus
  • Screening mammography (for patients with no symptoms)

What to Expect

During a mammogram, you stand in front of the mammography machine, and the technologist places one of your breasts on a platform and adjusts the platform to a comfortable height for you. The technologist helps you position your head, arms, and torso to allow a clear and unobstructed view of your breast tissue. Your breast is gradually compressed against the platform by a clear, plastic plate. Pressure is applied for a few seconds to spread the breast tissue out.

Compression of the breast minimizes the dose of radiation needed to penetrate the tissue and holds your breast still to decrease blurring from movement. During the brief x-ray exposure, you’ll be asked to remain still, and compression will automatically release once the exposure is complete.

After images are made of both your breasts, the technologist will check the quality of the images. If the views are inadequate for technical reasons, such as motion or the need to include more breast tissue than what is seen, you may have to repeat part of the test.

After the test, if you are being seen for a yearly routine screening mammogram, you are free to leave once your imaging is complete. According to federal law, you will be notified of the results of your mammogram within 30 days, but you can usually expect to receive your results sooner. Your result letter will be mailed to you the day after your exam is read by the radiologist.

If you are being seen for diagnostic imaging, you can expect to wait while your images are reviewed in case further testing is needed. You will receive your results the same day. If the radiologist notes any areas of question or concern on your screening mammogram, further testing will be recommended, and we will contact you for scheduling. To communicate easily and securely with your WVU Medicine provider, sign up for our free patient portal, MyWVUChart.

Appointments and Directions

855-WVU-CARE 855-988-2273

Cheat Lake
608 Cheat Road
Morgantown, WV 26508

University Town Centre
6040 University Town Centre Drive
Morgantown, WV 26501

Fairmont Outpatient Center
100 Stoney Hill Road
Fairmont, WV 26554

Betty Puskar Breast Care Center
1 Medical Center Drive
Morgantown, WV 26506

Clinic Number

304-293-8012

Nuclear medicine is a specialized area of radiology that can help diagnose and treat various conditions, such as tumors, infections, hematomas, organ enlargement, and cysts, by using very small amounts of radioactive materials called radiopharmaceuticals. The dose of radiation is very low and is not harmful.

Nuclear medicine may be used to treat hyperthyroidism, thyroid cancer, and lymphomas and provide treatment options for other complex cancerous conditions, including prostate cancer that has spread to the bones and stage IV colon cancer that has spread to the liver.

WVU Medicine is recognized for the highest level of imaging quality and patient safety by the American College of Radiology in nuclear medicine. Our caring, knowledgeable, and experienced technologists are all board and state certified experts in their fields.

Imaging We Offer

WVU Medicine Imaging Services offers nuclear medicine scans to diagnose many medical conditions and diseases, including:

  • Bone scans
  • Brain/neurological imaging
  • Cardiac ejection fraction
  • Gastrointestinal studies
  • Heart scans
  • Hepatobiliary scans
  • Infection imaging
  • PET-CT scan
  • Renal scans
  • Thyroid scans
  • Tumor imaging/localization

What to expect

Depending on the type of nuclear medicine exam you’re having, radiopharmaceuticals will be injected intravenously, swallowed, or inhaled as a gas. Except for intravenous injections, most nuclear medicine procedures are painless and are rarely associated with significant discomfort or side effects.

It can take anywhere from a few seconds to several days for the radiotracer to travel through the body and accumulate in the organ or area of the body being studied. Your imaging test may be performed immediately, a few hours later, or even several days after you’ve received the radiopharmaceuticals.

When it’s time for the imaging to begin, the radiopharmaceuticals emit a very small amount of radiation that’s detected by the camera. The scanner takes a series of images and may rotate around you while you lie in one position. You may be asked to change positions in between images. You’ll need to remain as still as possible during the exam, so that clear, accurate images may be captured. The length of time for nuclear medicine imaging varies widely, depending on the type of exam. Actual scanning can take 20 minutes to several hours or may be conducted over several days.

Once your nuclear medicine procedure is complete, the images will be reviewed by a board-certified radiologist. Your doctor will receive an electronic copy of the imaging report and notify you with the results. To communicate easily and securely with your WVU Medicine provider, sign up for our free patient portal, MyWVUChart.

Appointments and Directions

855-WVU-CARE 855-988-2273

J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital

1 Medical Center Drive
Morgantown, WV 26506

Clinic Number

304-598-4253

Preparing For Your Test

Depending on the imaging test that’s being performed, preparation will vary. The following are some general guidelines to prepare for imaging procedures. Please check with your physician or physician’s office to see what specific preparation is needed for your test.

CT scan
You may need to remove any metal objects, like jewelry, eyeglasses, or dentures, which could interfere with the clarity of your CT scan. Depending on the part of the body that is being tested, a special dye called contrast material may be necessary to help highlight the blood vessels and internal structures of the body. You may receive contrast material by mouth (for esophagus or stomach imaging), by injection (for gallbladder, urinary tract, or liver imaging), or by enema (for intestinal imaging). It can take up to an hour for contrast material to distribute throughout the body before your imaging test can begin.

MRI
Because an MRI uses powerful magnets, the presence of metal on or in your body may be a safety concern and can affect clarity of the images. You’ll need to remove any metal objects, like jewelry, eyeglasses, or dentures, and let the technologist know if you have any metal or electronic devices in your body, such as a pacemaker, cochlear implants, or a defibrillator. Even some cosmetics contain small amounts of metal, so it is best to not wear makeup. Notify your physician prior to the MRI if you are pregnant or think that you could be pregnant.

Mammogram
Schedule your mammogram the week after your menstrual period (if you have not experienced menopause), so that your breast are less likely to be tender. If you’ve had a mammogram before, please bring any previous mammogram records to your exam. Avoid using deodorants, antiperspirants, powders, lotions, creams, or perfumes under your arms or on your breasts because metallic particles in these products could interfere with the clarity of your breast imaging. If mammograms cause any discomfort for you, consider taking an over-the-counter pain medication, such as Tylenol or ibuprofen, about an hour before the exam.

PET-CT scan
Patients must not eat or drink anything for four hours prior to the exam and avoid foods high in sugar and carbohydrates the day before and the day of the scan. Avoid wearing anything metal, like a belt or jewelry. Avoid physical activity or anything strenuous before the exam. Depending on your individual health condition, preparation for a PET-CT fusion may vary, especially if you are diabetic or have a heart condition. Please discuss preparations with your healthcare provider.

Ultrasound
Some ultrasounds require no preparation, but others, like right upper quadrant, liver, or gallbladder, require nothing by mouth for up to eight hours before your appointment, including gum and cigarettes. If you are not properly fasted when you arrive for your exam, we will reschedule your appointment, so we can provide the best possible imaging results. Other ultrasounds, like pelvic or vaginal, require a full or empty bladder to properly visualize the uterus and ovaries. Ask your doctor about any specific instructions you’ll need to follow before your ultrasound.

More information

  • If you think you could be pregnant, even if there’s only a possibility, tell the imaging staff before your exam.
  • For safety reasons, children may not accompany patients into imaging procedures.
  • Bring a list of your current medications and any medication allergies to your appointment.
  • If you have any special needs or think that you may experience discomfort during an imaging test, let us know ahead of time, so that we can make arrangements to accommodate you.

Frequently Asked Questions

Will I experience any pain or discomfort during an imaging test?
Imaging tests are usually quick and painless. Some women experience mild discomfort from compression of breast tissue during a mammogram, and it can help to take an over-the-counter pain reliever about an hour before the procedure. If you’re having an MRI, PET, or CT scan and you have a fear of enclosed spaces (claustrophobia), you can request a medication from you doctor to help you feel sleepy and less anxious. Our Cinemavision system provides movies or music during your imaging exam, and patients can also bring along their favorite movie or CD. A technologist monitors you throughout your imaging test. If the technologist is in another room during your procedure, they can see you and hear you if you need to speak with them. If you have any concerns or special needs, please do not hesitate to discuss them with us before your exam.

How long does an imaging test take?
Depending on what type of procedure you’re having, the length of imaging tests varies. Some imaging tests are quick with high-quality images captured in seconds, but more specialized imaging can take longer. Ask questions when your imaging test is being scheduled or call your physician’s office, so you will know what to expect.

Should I be concerned about radiation exposure?
The amount of radiation that patients are exposed to during procedures is very small and does not have any lasting effects on the body. The fast, modern imaging machines that WVU Medicine uses are equipped to perform high-quality imaging with the lowest doses of radiation in the industry. We are committed to patient safety and are nationally recognized for excellent care by the American College of Radiology.

What are contrast materials and how do they work?
Depending on the part of the body that is being tested, a special dye called contrast material may be necessary to improve pictures of the inside of the body and help technologists distinguish normal and abnormal conditions. Contrast materials are safe drugs that do not permanently change the color of internal organs. They temporarily alter the way imaging tools interact with the body. After your imaging test, the contrast material is absorbed by the body or passed through urine and bowel movements.

Are there any side effects to imaging tests?
Most imaging tests are quick, painless, and have no side effects. Although rare, people can be allergic to contrast materials used in some imaging tests. Most reactions are mild and include itchiness, rash, or hives. Mild allergies to contrast material can be pretreated with medications. In rare instances, a reaction to contrast materials can be serious and life threatening. Notify your physician and technologist about any prior reactions to dye, so that precautions can be considered or an alternative test can be ordered. Discuss any concerns about possible side effects from imaging or contract materials with your physician before your exam.

What happens after my imaging test?
Your imaging test is interpreted by a highly-trained radiologist, and the results are reported to your referring physician electronically. Your doctor will contact you with the results and let you know if any additional follow-up care is needed. If you have questions about your imaging test, please feel free to contact us. WVU Medicine patients can contact their physician’s office and schedule appointments through our secure, online patient portal, MyWVUChart.

Ariel Bailey, MD

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J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital
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SoHyun Boo, MD

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Assistant Professor, Section Chief, Neuroradiology and Interventional Neuroradiology, Associate Stroke Director for Endovascular Therapies
J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital, Jefferson Medical Center
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Justin Browning, PA-C

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Physician Assistant
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Cara Bryan, MD

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Associate Professor
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J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital
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J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital
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David Fore, MD

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Mathis Frick, MD

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Robert Grammer, MD

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J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital
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Eyassu Hailemichael, MD

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J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital
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Cathy Kim, MD

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J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital
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Mithra Kimyai-Asadi, MD

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Jennifer Koay, MD

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ASST TEACHER (60103)
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William Krantz, MD

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Assistant Professor
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Mark Lisle, MD

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J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital
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Daniel Martin, MD

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Kevin McCluskey, MD

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Rashi Mehta, MD

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J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital
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Thuan-Phuong Nguyen, MD

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Ansaar Rai, MD

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Robert Tallaksen, MD

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Abdul Tarabishy, MD

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Kenneth Veselicky, MD, DDS

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Lana Winkler, MD

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