WVU Medicine Cabinet News Stories

2010 Cards of Hope collection available for purchase

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Every summer, West Virginia University Children’s Hospital throws a party and provides cancer patients, cancer survivors and their siblings the opportunity to just be kids and forget about cancer for a little while. Though the party is held during the summer, it has a winter twist – those who attend design holiday greeting cards called Cards of Hope. [...]

WVU pathology labs pass rigorous inspection

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The Clinical Laboratories at West Virginia University Hospitals have been awarded a two-year term of accreditation by the College of American Pathologists (CAP), based on the results of recent unannounced onsite inspections. Lab director Peter L. Perrotta, M.D., was congratulated for achievement of this national recognition from CAP. During the accreditation process, WVU Hospitals’ lab records and quality control procedures for the preceding two years were thoroughly examined. In addition, inspectors checked management practices and lab staff qualifications, as well as equipment, facilities and safety records. Since the early 1960s, The CAP Laboratory Accreditation Program has been recognized by the federal government as being equal to or more stringent than the government’s own inspection program. Because inspections are so comprehensive, accreditation helps achieve a consistently high level of service throughout an institution or healthcare system.   [...]

WVU students donate to Scott’s Run Settlement House

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – For their fall service learning project, students in classes through the West Virginia University Department of Community Medicine donated Thanksgiving food items to Scott’s Run Settlement House. The students are in the classes of Ruth Kershner, Ed.D., professor, and Toni Morris, instructor. Pi Beta Phi sorority also contributed to the effort. In all, the students donated more than 40 Thanksgiving meals and $700 in grocery store gift certificates. “During the holiday season tough economic times are always more apparent,” Dr. Kershner said. “These students are to be commended for the incredible generosity and kindness they have shown.” Scott’s Run Settlement House, founded in the 1920s, primarily serves in-need residents located in Monongalia County and provides more than 18 different programs.   [...]

WVU breast cancer expert selected as “Pink Tie Guy”

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – West Virginia University breast cancer expert Jame Abraham, M.D., has been appointed to the inaugural class of the Susan G. Komen West Virginia Chapter of Pink Tie Guys. The state affiliate named eight people in West Virginia to the elite group based on their continued dedication to fighting breast cancer. Abraham, section chief of Hematology Oncology at WVU and the first Bonnie Wells Wilson Distinguished Professor and Eminent Scholar in Breast Cancer Research, was the only physician selected. “Dr. Abraham was chosen because of his commitment to breast cancer research,” said Kim Johnson, Susan G. Komen Pink Tie Coordinator. “Nancy G. Brinker promised her dying sister, Susan G. Komen, she would do everything in her power to end breast cancer forever. In 1982, that promise became Susan G. Komen for the Cure and launched the global breast cancer movement to save lives and end breast cancer forever by empowering people, ensuring quality care for all and energizing science to find the cures. We hope that Dr. Abraham will continue his efforts with research and treatment to help end breast cancer.” “I am honored and proud to be a Komen Pink Tie Guy,” said Abraham. “Komen provides major financial support both at the state and national level to the Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center for WVU’s Bonnie Wells Wilson Mobile Mammography Program, which is aimed at reducing breast cancer mortality in West Virginia.  By working together, we are raising the bar on breast cancer awareness and early detection, and ultimately saving lives.” Over the next year Abraham and fellow Pink Tie Guys will serve as Komen ambassadors for breast health and represent the one in eight women who will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetimes. The Pink Tie Guys were honored and given a pink tie at Komen’s first annual Pink Tie Ball fundraiser in Charleston last month.  “Seventy five percent of the money Komen raises in West Virginia stays in West Virginia supporting local programs focused on breast health needs of medically underserved and ethnic populations,” said Johnson. “The additional 25 percent goes to the national Susan G. Komen Program for funding breast cancer research.” For more information on the West Virginia affiliate of Komen see www.komenwv.org.   [...]

Bonnie’s Bus Offers Mammograms Nov. 23 in Buffalo

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The 40-foot long Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Putnam County, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women. A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at Toyota Motor Manufacturing in Buffalo from 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 23. The mammograms are not free, but billing to insurers is provided.  Women who lack insurance may be matched to government or nonprofit charities. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. Screenings are only open to employees and their dependents. During its first year on the road in 2009, Bonnie’s Bus travelled 9,000 miles, visited 20 counties, and provided nearly 400 mammography screenings. The goal for 2010 is to make at least 60 site visits throughout West Virginia with a focus on communities that have the highest breast cancer mortality rates.  Bonnie’s Bus represents a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler's late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.hsc.wvu.edu/mbrcc/bonnie. Attention reporters and editors: If you are interested in covering Bonnie’s Bus when it visits your area, please call the HSC News Service in Morgantown at 304-293-7087 in advance. Out of respect for patient privacy and HIPAA, please do not show up at the location without scheduling an appropriate time for interviews and/or photos.   [...]

WVU’s Dr. Hassan Ramadan honored by national group

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) recently presented Hassan Ramadan, M.D., professor and vice chair of the West Virginia University Department of Otolaryngology, with its Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Ramadan received the award in recognition of his exceptional services in the scientific programs, exhibits, continuing education courses and instructional courses of the society. He became a member of the society in the early 1990s. Since that time, he has participated in every annual meeting of the AAO-HNS with a scientific course, poster or presentation. “I like to go to the meetings both to teach and to learn. It’s an opportunity to connect with colleagues in the field and exchange ideas, like new research and techniques, with them,” Ramadan said. “It’s great not only to learn but to share and teach. It’s very rewarding and satisfying.” Ramadan said he ultimately chose to become an otolaryngologist (an ear, nose and throat specialist) because of the specialty’s diversity and refinement. One day, he could be treating a facial fracture with screws and plates and the next day, he could be putting a 1.14 mm tube into a 1-year-old child’s ear. “It’s very interesting to me. There’s diversity not only in the way we treat people but also the types of people we see. We see very young children all the way up to adults who are 100 years old,” he said. Ramadan also likes the fact that he is both medical doctor and surgeon for his patients. “It improves continuity of care,” he said. “We’re it. We see you in the clinic, and if necessary, we perform your surgery.” The AAO-HNS presented Ramadan with the award at its 2010 Annual Meeting and OTO EXPO, which was held Sept. 26-29 in Boston. The meeting is the largest gathering of otolaryngologists in the world with more than 165 scientific research sessions, 200 posters and more than 300 instruction course hours for attendees. For more information on the AAO-HNS see www.entnet.org. For more information on the WVU Department of Otolaryngology see http://wvuhealthcare.com/services/otolaryngology/index.aspx.   [...]

Bonnie’s Bus offers mammograms

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Jefferson, Barbour, Gilmer and Marion counties, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women. A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at the Eastern Panhandle Free Clinic in Ranson from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 16; at Belington Community Medical Center from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Nov. 17; at Federal Correctional Institute Gilmer in Glenville from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Nov. 18.; and at the Marion County Senior Citizens Inc.-North Marion Senior Center in Mannington from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Nov. 19. The mammograms are not free, but billing to insurers is provided.  Women who lack insurance may be matched to government or nonprofit charities. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. For a Bonnie’s Bus appointment at the Eastern Panhandle Free Clinic call 304-724-6091; at Belington Community Medical Center call 304-823-2800; and at Marion County Senior Citizens Inc.- North Marion Senior Center call the Marion County Health Department at 304-366-3360.  The Federal Correctional Institute Gilmer will offer screenings to employees from 8 a.m. to noon and to the public from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Employees should call 304-626-2500, ext.1079 to schedule an appointment.  The public should call 877-287-2272. During its first year on the road in 2009, the 40-foot long Bonnie’s Bus travelled 9,000 miles, visited 20 counties and provided nearly 400 mammography screenings. The goal for 2010 is to make at least 60 site visits throughout West Virginia with a focus on communities that have high breast cancer mortality rates. Bonnie’s Bus represents a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler's late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.hsc.wvu.edu/mbrcc/bonnie. Attention reporters and editors: If you are interested in covering Bonnie’s Bus when it visits your area, please call the HSC News Service in Morgantown at 304-293-7087 in advance. Out of respect for patient privacy and HIPAA, please do not show up at the location without scheduling an appropriate time for interviews and/or photos. [...]

WVU Healthcare to host Ornish open house Nov. 18

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – WVU Healthcare will host an open house for the Dr. Dean Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease from 5 to 7 p.m. on Nov. 18 near the cafeteria on the fourth floor of Ruby Memorial Hospital. Free health screenings including blood pressure, glucose and body composition to determine ideal body weight will be offered prior to the open house at 4 p.m. Ornish friendly appetizers will be served.  The program has enabled thousands of people to lower their risk of heart attack and avoid the need for procedures like angioplasty and coronary bypass surgery. Those who attend will learn more about how this unique program encompassing nutrition, stress management, moderate aerobic exercise and group support can help them and their loved ones.  “This lifestyle modification program enables participants to slow, stop and reverse many of the symptoms of coronary artery disease,” Dave Harshbarger, program director, said. “Many people are able to avoid invasive procedures, such as bypass surgery and angioplasty, and stave off first or repeat heart attacks or strokes.” The Ornish Program combines a low-fat vegetarian diet, moderate aerobic exercise, stress management and social support to reduce chest pain (angina), blockages in coronary arteries and serum cholesterol levels. The program’s components help improve blood flow through the heart muscle, exercise capacity and the sense of well-being and satisfaction with life. “The Ornish Program is a change in diet, attitude and lifestyle. People learn how to eat properly and adopt healthy behaviors to stop sabotaging themselves. They get back in control and start doing activities that many of them thought were lost forever,” Harshbarger said. “But the best news is that even for people with documented heart disease, it’s not too late.” Candidates for the program include: •    People who are contemplating bypass surgery or angioplasty, but seeking an alternative that may reduce the need for these procedures. •    People who have previously experienced one or more heart procedures and want to minimize the chances of repeating them. •    People diagnosed with coronary artery disease (angina or past heart attacks). •    People with significant risk factors for heart disease, such as high cholesterol levels and a strong family history. “All of our participants have lost weight and dropped overall body fat,” Harshbarger said. “Their cholesterol levels have declined and their perceived stress has decreased dramatically.” For more information and to RSVP for the open house, call 304-293-2520. Those insured by PEIA and Blue Cross/Blue Shield plans may qualify for coverage. For more information on the Dean Ornish program at WVU see www.hsc.wvu.edu/wellness/ornish.   [...]

Radiothon to benefit WVU Children’s Hospital

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The 12th Annual Q for Kids Radiothon benefiting West Virginia University Children’s Hospital will hit the airwaves live beginning on Tuesday, Nov. 16. WVU Children’s Hospital, Children’s Miracle Network and three radio stations will host the radiothon in the cafeteria of Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown. The stations are 101.9 FM WVAQ, 93.5 WBTQ and 94.1 FM WQZK. Broadcasts will be held from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 16 and 17. Radio personalities will tell stories about children who have benefited from services provided by WVU Children's Hospital. Patients from Morgantown and the surrounding region are also scheduled to visit the radiothon to share their stories on air. Last year’s radiothon raised more than $120,000 in support of WVU Children’s Hospital. As part of the festivities, Cold Stone Creamery ice cream will be on sale Tuesday (Nov. 16) from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. “People who haven’t needed our services may know that we’re here, but they may be unaware of the miracles that happen every day at WVU Children’s Hospital,” Cheryl Jones, R.N., director of WVU Children’s Hospital, said. “The radiothon helps those people learn about what we do so that if they do ever need us, they’ll know they’re in good hands.” The toll free number for donations during the radiothon is 877-719-KIDS (5437). WVU Children's Hospital provides maternal, infant and pediatric care for West Virginia and the surrounding region, giving care to high-risk mothers, premature infants and children with life-threatening conditions through adolescence to adulthood. For information on WVU Children's Hospital, see www.wvukids.com.  The Children's Miracle Network is a fundraising program to benefit hospitals providing healthcare for children. Created by the Osmond Foundation in 1983, the Children’s Miracle Network includes 170 hospitals throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. For information on Children's Miracle Network, see www.childrensmiraclenetwork.org.   [...]