WVU Medicine Cabinet News Stories

Bonnie’s Bus offers mammograms

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Pendleton and Ritchie counties next week, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women. A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at Pendleton Community Care in Franklin from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 19 and at Ritchie County Primary Care in Harrisville from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Oct. 21 and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Oct. 22. The mammograms are not free, but billing to insurers is provided.  Women who lack insurance may be matched to government or nonprofit charities. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. For a Bonnie’s Bus appointment, call Pendleton Community Care at 304-358-2355 or Ritchie County Primary Care at 304-643-4005. During its first year on the road in 2009, the 40-foot long Bonnie’s Bus travelled 9,000 miles, visited 20 counties and provided nearly 400 mammography screenings. The goal for 2010 is to make at least 60 site visits throughout West Virginia with a focus on communities that have high breast cancer mortality rates. Bonnie’s Bus represents a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler's late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.hsc.wvu.edu/mbrcc/bonnie.   [...]

Kohl’s to donate nearly $130,000 to WVU Children’s Hospital

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Kohl's Department Store will present a check for nearly $130,000 to the Kohl’s Healthy Kids University at West Virginia University Children’s Hospital at 11 a.m. Oct. 20 at the Kohl’s store on Bosley Parkway in Parkersburg. Donations were collected from Kohl’s stores throughout the state. Since 1999, Kohl’s has donated more than $566,000 to WVU Children’s Hospital. “Kohl’s has been a great supporter of WVU Children’s Hospital for more than a decade. We are very grateful that they continue to renew their partnership with us year after year,” Cheryl Jones, R.N., director of WVU Children’s Hospital, said. The event will feature the Kohl’s Germ Free Kids Club, which teaches children in kindergarten through third grades proper hand-washing techniques and the importance of proper hand washing to stay healthy and reduce the spread of germs. In addition to the Germ Free Kids Club, the Healthy Kids University at WVU Children’s Hospital includes the Healthy Babies program, which provides education to new parents, and Babysitting 101, which teaches teens basic child-care skills. Kohl's commitment to WVU Children’s Hospital is made possible through the Kohl's Cares cause merchandise program. Through this initiative, Kohl’s sells $5 books and plush toys; 100 percent of net profit benefits children’s health and education programs nationwide, including hospital partnerships like this one. Kohl's has raised more than $150 million dollars through this merchandise program. In addition, Kohl's Cares features a scholarship program, which recognizes more than 2,100 young volunteers with a total of $410,000 in scholarships and prizes this year; the Associates in Action program, which encourages associate volunteerism and provided more than $10 million in grants to youth-focused nonprofit organizations last year alone; and fundraising gift cards for schools and youth-serving organizations. For more information, visit www.kohlscorporation.com. For more information on WVU Children’s Hospital see www.wvukids.com. Kohl’s Department Stores Based in Menomonee Falls, Wis., Kohl’s (NYSE: KSS) is a family-focused, value-oriented specialty department store offering moderately priced, exclusive and national brand apparel, shoes, accessories, beauty and home products in an exciting shopping environment.  By the end of September, Kohl’s operates 1,089 stores in 49 states with a commitment to environmental leadership. In support of the communities it serves, Kohl’s has raised more than $150 million for children’s initiatives nationwide through its Kohl’s Cares® cause merchandise program, which operates under Kohl's Cares, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Kohl's Department Stores, Inc. For a list of store locations and information, or for the added convenience of shopping online, visit www.kohls.com.   [...]

WVU women’s soccer team to make $12,000 donation to Breast Care Center at halftime

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Members of the West Virginia University women's soccer team will declare Sunday Breast Cancer Awareness Day during their Oct. 17 matchup against Georgetown at Dick Dlesk Soccer Stadium. The Mountaineers will dress the part, wearing pink Nike uniforms during the game, and present a donation of more than $12,000 to the WVU Betty Puskar Breast Cancer Fund during halftime. Fans will be provided pink bracelets, breast cancer awareness magnets and educational material about breast cancer. “The Betty Puskar Breast Care Center here at WVU is a vital organization that plays a pivotal role in the ongoing fight against breast cancer,” WVU assistant coach Marisa Kanela said. “The Center’s support and dedication to women battling this disease is truly inspiring. While we cannot change the disease itself, we hope that the continued support over the years that the women’s soccer team has brought to the community will help aid in the fight. Little by little each year we are trying to give courage to those fighting, to keep battling because they are not alone. Today these young ladies are not just fighting for a win, they are fighting for a cause.” The WVU women’s soccer team raised $12,141 this past spring in its effort to help fight breast cancer. On March 6, the team competed in the “Three’s a Team … the Fourth’s a Mountaineer” all-day event at the Caperton Indoor Facility. The annual 4-on-4 tournament was open to boys and girls in grades three through eight, with an open division for college-age and older groups. West Virginia also played Pitt and Akron in the seventh annual Betty Puskar Breast Care Center Soccer Invitational on April 10 at Dick Dlesk Soccer Stadium. The donation goes directly to the Betty Puskar Breast Cancer Fund, which supports diagnosis and treatment efforts and helps patients and their families in the midst of battling breast cancer. “Speaking for the team, we know that many people are affected by breast cancer, and we want to let people know that we will fight for them,” junior soccer player Meghan Lewis said. “It is also our way to contribute and give something back, because this devastating disease affects many women, especially our friends and families.” Fans are encouraged to wear pink at Sunday’s 1 p.m. contest against the Hoyas. Over the past seven years, the women’s soccer team has raised more than $60,000 for the Breast Care Center. For more information on the Betty Puskar Breast Care Center, see www.hsc.wvu.edu/mbrcc/bpbcc.   [...]

WVU Health Sciences marks 50 years of leadership in health

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – In 1960 the West Virginia University Health Sciences Center and University Hospital opened to great fanfare and high expectations. Until that time, there had been a shortage of healthcare professionals in the state, and access to healthcare was a challenge for many, especially for those with serious medical issues. Over the past 50 years, thousands of WVU Health Sciences graduates in medicine, nursing, dentistry, pharmacy and other health professions have cared for patients in every corner of the state and throughout the country.  West Virginians who need specialty care have relied on WVU Healthcare physicians, hospitals and outpatient clinics to provide the highest quality of care, without having to leave the state. “A half a century ago, West Virginia University made a promise to the people of this state,” WVU Health Sciences Chancellor Christopher C. Colenda, M.D., M.P.H., said. “In exchange for their support, we created a network of people and institutions that is by far the largest force for health in our state.” The original health sciences and hospital building was built a penny at a time through the pop tax, thanks to the foresight and determination of Gov. Okey Patteson.  “As promised in 1960, we have changed the face of healthcare in the state,” Colenda said. “Our schools, our hospitals and clinics, and our research labs offer a welcoming beacon to the best and brightest young West Virginians – and attract a steady stream of well-educated, strongly motivated and highly productive people from around the world to West Virginia.” The West Virginia economy is $2.2 billion larger because of the presence of WVU’s health sciences schools, clinics, and hospitals, according to a study completed earlier this year by Tripp Umbach, a Pittsburgh research firm. Based on 2009 data, the firm calculated that 15,600 jobs statewide exist because of WVU-related health spending. State and local governments collected $191 million in tax revenue from businesses and individuals associated with WVU Healthcare and the schools. The anniversary of WVU Health Sciences is being celebrated at a Convocation for the health sciences and university communities at 4 p.m. today (Friday, Oct. 15) at the Creative Arts Center in Morgantown.  Harvey V. Fineberg, M.D., Ph.D., president of the Institute of Medicine, is the keynote speaker.  Sen. Jay Rockefeller also will attend the celebration. The Fall 2010 issue of “WVUhealth” magazine examines and illustrates the history and accomplishments of WVU Health Sciences, and can be accessed electronically at a special HSC 50th website:  www.hsc.wvu.edu/50-years.   [...]

DUI simulator to be set up at Mountainlair

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – In the U.S., alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes kill someone every 31 minutes and injure someone every two minutes. To show people the dangers of drinking and driving, the West Virginia University Department of Community Medicine will have a simulator set up from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Oct. 13 in front of the Mountainlair. [...]

Charleston radiothon to benefit WVU Children’s Hospital

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The Second Annual WQBE and Electric 102 Cares for Kids Radiothon benefiting West Virginia University Children’s Hospital will hit the airwaves live beginning on Thursday, Oct. 14. [...]

Bonnie’s Bus offers mammograms

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Putnam and Barbour counties next week, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women. A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at the Teays Valley FamilyCare HealthCenter in Scott Depot from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 12 and at Belington Community Medical Services from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Oct. 13 and 14. The mammograms are not free, but billing to insurers is provided.  Women who lack insurance may be matched to government or nonprofit charities. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. You must be a patient of the Teays Valley FamilyCare HealthCenter to get a Bonnie’s Bus appointment at that clinic. Call 304-757-6999. For a Bonnie’s Bus appointment at Belington Community Medical Services call 304-823-2800. During its first year on the road in 2009, the 40-foot long Bonnie’s Bus travelled 9,000 miles, visited 20 counties and provided nearly 400 mammography screenings. The goal for 2010 is to make at least 60 site visits throughout West Virginia with a focus on communities that have high breast cancer mortality rates. Bonnie’s Bus represents a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler's late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.hsc.wvu.edu/mbrcc/bonnie.   [...]

WVU’s National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health offers wellness retreat in Wetzel County

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The West Virginia University National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health is inviting women in Wetzel County and the surrounding area to spend a day focusing on their well-being and personal empowerment. The Women on Wellness (WOW) retreat on Saturday, Oct. 16  is a day for and about women.  [...]

Meet an important member of the WVU Healthcare team: Physician Assistant

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Dena Pozeg, PA-C, wanted a career where she could help people and feel like she was making a difference in their lives. That’s why she became a physician assistant (PA). She is one of the 54 physician assistants at WVU Healthcare whose work is being recognized as a part of National Physician Assistants Week (Oct. 6-12). According to the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA), physician assistants are health professionals who practice medicine as members of a team with their supervising physicians. PAs deliver a broad range of medical and surgical services to diverse populations in rural and urban settings. As part of their comprehensive responsibilities, PAs conduct physical exams, diagnose and treat illnesses, order and interpret tests, counsel on preventive healthcare, assist in surgery and prescribe medications. “PAs are trained to work within a team in conjunction with others. I really like the idea of a team effort,” Pozeg said. “PAs are also trained to be an advocate for the patient and normally have a little more time to spend with patients than the physicians, since they act as an extension of them.” Pozeg works as the chief PA for the section of trauma and critical care surgery, where she goes to traumas, takes care of inpatients, does consults and sees patients in the clinic. She also acts as the primary contact for patients who have been discharged and call with needs, including answering questions or calling in refills for prescriptions. Working in trauma is never the same as the day before, Pozeg said, and that’s one of the reasons she chose to pursue that specialty. “Our patients are significantly ill or injured and most times ‘fixable.’ It gives me a great feeling to see patients in the outpatient clinic after their hospital course and know that I have helped them progress back to their normal lives,” she said. “It’s a really great feeling to see someone walk when they were unable to before or see someone who previously had a traumatic brain injury improve and return to school or work. Trauma just makes me feel that I can touch the lives of so many that need help.” Alison Wilson, M.D., director of the Jon Michael Moore Trauma Center and chief of trauma and critical care surgery, said physician assistants are vital to the continuum of care for both inpatients and outpatients. “Physician assistants are an integral part of the healthcare team,” she said. “Their roles are developing and expanding. They will be essential to the success of healthcare in the future.” For more information on physician assistants, see www.aapa.org.  For more information on WVU Healthcare, see www.wvuhealth.com.   [...]