WVU Medicine Cabinet News Stories

Protea and MBRCC announce cancer research collaboration

The following information was released by Protea Biosciences today: [...]

Bonnie’s Bus offers mammograms March 24 in Augusta

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Hampshire County this month, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women.  A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at the Hampshire County Health Department in Augusta from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 24.   The mammograms are billed to insurance, Medicaid or Medicare if available. Mammograms for women who do not have insurance will be covered by the West Virginia Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program or through a special grant from the Susan B. Komen for the Cure Foundation. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. For a Bonnie’s Bus appointment call the Hampshire County Health Department at 304-496-9640.  Last year, Bonnie’s Bus made 65 visits in 30 counties throughout West Virginia providing mammography screening to nearly 800 women. About half of those screened were medically underserved and from challenged socio-economic backgrounds and qualified for screening through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program. The goal for this year is to screen at least 1,200 women. Bonnie’s Bus works in collaboration with a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler's late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.wvucancer.org/bonnie.  Attention reporters and editors: If you are interested in covering Bonnie’s Bus when it visits your area, please call the HSC News Service in Morgantown at 304-293-7087 in advance. Out of respect for patient privacy, please do not show up at the location without scheduling an appropriate time for interviews and/or photos. [...]

Bonnie’s Bus offers mammograms March 23 in Paw Paw

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Morgan County this month, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women.  A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at the Mountaineer Community Health Center in Paw Paw from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, March 23.   The mammograms are billed to insurance, Medicaid or Medicare if available. Mammograms for women who do not have insurance will be covered by the West Virginia Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program or through a special grant from the Susan B. Komen for the Cure Foundation. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. For a Bonnie’s Bus appointment call the Mountaineer Community Health Center at 304-947-5500.  Last year, Bonnie’s Bus made 65 visits in 30 counties throughout West Virginia providing mammography screening to nearly 800 women. About half of those screened were medically underserved and from challenged socio-economic backgrounds and qualified for screening through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program. The goal for this year is to screen at least 1,200 women. Bonnie’s Bus works in collaboration with a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler's late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.wvucancer.org/bonnie.  Attention reporters and editors: If you are interested in covering Bonnie’s Bus when it visits your area, please call the HSC News Service in Morgantown at 304-293-7087 in advance. Out of respect for patient privacy, please do not show up at the location without scheduling an appropriate time for interviews and/or photos.   [...]

Match Day: WVU medical grads selected for residency training

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – For four years the 94 students in the West Virginia University School of Medicine Class of 2011 studied long hours and made great sacrifices to reach their goal to become physicians. Today, they anxiously watched the clock, knowing that at noon they would finally learn where they will go for the next phase of their training, known as residency. Medical students throughout the nation learned of their residency selections at noon on Thursday, March 17, at Match Day ceremonies. This year’s WVU celebrations were held simultaneously at the WVU Erickson Alumni Center in Morgantown, the Charleston Division Education building in Charleston and the Eastern Division’s Educational Building in Martinsburg.  Thirty-six percent of WVU School of Medicine Class of 2011 will continue training in the state. Sixty-nine percent of them will be either in West Virginia or a bordering state for their training. “We have seen more students choosing to stay in the state or nearby for the start of their residency training. That certainly shows the loyalty of our students to West Virginia and that they recognize our strong graduate training programs,” G. Anne Cather, M.D., associate dean of student services and professional development and professor of family medicine, said. “These are important statistics because research has shown that residents tend to establish their practices close to where they train. One-fourth of our non-resident students will be starting their residency training in West Virginia this July.” Forty-one percent of the graduates will train in internal medicine, pediatrics, family medicine or obstetrics/gynecology, fields that typically represent a person’s primary healthcare. Other popular fields this year were the specialties of psychiatry, emergency medicine and anesthesiology. “Our students matched in 19 different fields and will go to 19 different states,” Dr. Cather said. “This is a great day in the lives of all graduating medical students,” Arthur J. Ross, M.D., dean of the WVU School of Medicine, said. “In many respects it is even more memorable for them than their actual graduation ceremony. Today is the day when they learn where they will go, as ‘new doctors’ to further their education and training as they prepare for a life of service to humankind. We are extremely proud of all our students and are especially pleased to see that so many of them will remain in West Virginia; we expect that many more will return to West Virginia once they complete their training.” [...]

WVU Healthcare celebrates Certified Nurses Day

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – WVU Healthcare will celebrate Certified Nurses Day on March 19 by honoring more than 300 board-certified nurses for their professionalism, leadership and commitment to excellence in patient care. According to the American Nurses Credentialing Center, board certification is an important way to distinguish that a nurse has a met a level of distinction and knowledge indicating professional nursing practice. Board certification also gives the public some assurance that nurses must engage in lifelong learning to maintain and renew their certification and, in the case of advanced practice nurses, their authorization/licensure to practice. The public recognizes the significance of this achievement, and it provides some assurance that the individual who is caring for them has acquired a predetermined level of knowledge in the specialty area of practice. “Certified Nurses Day recognizes the motivation and self direction of all nurses who have obtained certification in their specialties. The board certification exam is very challenging, and passing it requires a high level of knowledge in one’s specialty,” Dottie Oakes, R.N., WVU Hospitals vice president and chief nursing executive, said. “We encourage all of our nurses to obtain board certification to increase their knowledge to provide quality patient care.” There are more than 50 nursing certification specialties, including medical-surgical, pediatric, pain management, cardiovascular, oncology, hospice, case management, emergency nursing, critical care and several others. Certified Nurses Day is held annually on March 19, which is the birthday of Margretta “Gretta” Madden Styles, R.N., Ed.D., a renowned expert of nurse credentialing.   [...]

WVU School of Medicine students to receive white coats

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Students in the West Virginia University School of Medicine will soon be adding a new article of clothing to their ensembles. The conferring of white coats represents a big step in the progression of most medical students across the country. WVU’s John W. Traubert White Coat Ceremony will take place at 1 p.m. on March 19 in the Mountainlair Ballrooms.  Upon entering their second year of medical school, students are presented with their white coats as a reminder of the dedication to expertise, professionalism and excellence that is an inherent part of a medical career. The white coat is meant to be a symbol of compassion and focuses on the importance of the relationship between doctors and patients. The first ceremony took place in 1993; its main goal was to help students realize that not only did they have a responsibility to patient health but also managing patient relationships. At this point, medical students begin to practice more hands-on medicine. The WVU ceremony stresses the importance of this transitional point in the medical student’s career. During the event, professor and current member of the WVU School of Medicine Alumni Association, David Tingler, M.D., will be speaking on some of the impacts the ceremony has had on his life and career. Dr. Tingler, Class of 2003, is the first alumnus to have both attended the ceremony as a student and later serve as the featured speaker. The ceremony is named for John W. Traubert, M.D., former associate dean for student and curricular affairs at WVU School of Medicine. He practiced family medicine in Wellsburg before joining the WVU faculty as founding chair of the Department of Family Practice, now the Department of Family Medicine. A reception follows the ceremony.   [...]

WVU School of Medicine ranked 7th in U.S. News for rural medicine

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The West Virginia University School of Medicine has been ranked higher than ever – at number seven – for rural medicine and placed in the top 50 for primary care in the latest issue of U.S. News and World Report’s 2012 edition of “America’s Best Graduate Schools.”  [...]

WVU Pharmacy student to present seminar for Alzheimer's disease caregivers

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Second-year students from the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy are hosting a seminar to educate caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease. The event will take place at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, March 17 at the Alzheimer’s Association of West Virginia office, located at 1299 Pineview Drive in Morgantown. The presentation will include information on how to achieve effective communication between caregivers and their loved ones, management of their medications, behavioral changes associated with the disease, services that your pharmacist can offer and services that the Alzheimer's Association offers. There will also be a question-and-answer session following the presentation. Food and beverages provided by Subway will be available to all attendees. For additional questions or to RSVP for the event, please contact Pam Shriver at the Alzheimer’s Association of West Virginia at 304-599-1159 or pam.shriver@alz.org.   [...]

Art students brighten WVU Children’s Hospital walls

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – A friendly, familiar face is a welcome sight to any hospital patient. Thanks to a group of Morgantown eighth graders, three well-known celebrities now greet visitors to West Virginia University Children’s Hospital. Led by teacher Mary Jane Herrington, art students at South Middle School put several weeks of painstakingly tedious work into the creation of three collages depicting popular “Toy Story” characters Buzz Lightyear, Woody, and Jessie the Yodeling Cowgirl. Each finished piece stands four to five feet tall and was “painted” with bits of color snipped from magazine pages glued to heavy cardboard. Herrington uses the exercise with her eighth grade classes to illustrate how proper use of color and color value can make an image created on a flat surface appear three-dimensional. Students nominate a list of unique looking people or characters and then narrow the field of contenders. After the subjects are selected, the real work begins. “The collaging process takes the entire six weeks of their art class, five days a week and 45 minutes per class,” explained Herrington. “These three figures are by far the best overall success because the kids were so into this project, were great kids to begin with, took pride in their work and enjoyed this lesson. We ended up staying after school numerous times throughout the six weeks, working until 5 p.m.” As the colorful figures took shape, Buzz, Woody, and Jessie looked so great that Herrington suggested her students’ work could brighten the day of WVU Children’s Hospital patients. “When I saw the high degree of perfection, I suggested that maybe we could donate them,” said Herrington. “The kids got all excited and were really inspired by that goal to do even better.” The popular trio’s arrival offered a chance for their creators to enjoy breakfast and a tour of WVU Children’s Hospital. The collages are now prominently displayed at the entrance of the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU).   [...]