WVU Medicine Cabinet News Stories

WVUH Nutrition Services employees to graduate from customer service training

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – On Friday (March 25), employees in West Virginia University Hospitals Nutrition Services will graduate from customer service training in preparation for the department’s transition to a room service style of patient meal delivery, which is scheduled to occur this summer. Nutrition Services partnered with Don Miller and Associates, a coaching group that assists non-contract healthcare food service departments improve performance. Employees will graduate from the group’s “Destination 10 – Customer Service Academy,” which according to the group’s website is a “formalized, structured set of tools and services focused on inspiring food service teams to perform at the highest performance level.” The purpose of the training is to prepare employees for the upcoming switch from scheduled meal delivery to room service delivery. In this system, patients will phone a hospitality center to place their orders between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Four customer service agents will be on hand to answer the calls. Meals will be delivered to patients within 45 minutes. “Room service is a patient meal delivery system that has been implemented in hospitals across the country over the past 10 to15 years,” Kendra Stoen, director of WVUH Nutrition Services, said. “We are very excited to offer this service to our patients. It is a huge transition for all involved, but the patient satisfaction results that other hospitals have seen make it worth the effort.” Telecommunications will provide reports to Nutrition Services regarding peak call volume times, wait times and lost calls, so that the department can adjust as necessary. Reports will also be run toward the end of each normal meal period to see who has not ordered so those patients can be checked on. “With this style of meal delivery, patients are happier, and in the long run, it’s less expensive for us than traditional meal delivery,” Stoen said. “But the number one reason to do this is patient satisfaction. At the end of the day, that’s what we’re here for.” Graduation ceremonies will be held at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. in conference rooms 7 and 8 on the fourth floor of Ruby Memorial Hospital.   [...]

WVU study finds link between early menopause and environmental chemicals

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – A study by researchers in the West Virginia University Department of Community Medicine found that women with high levels of an environmental chemical are at increased odds of having experienced menopause earlier in life than those with lower levels. Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are manmade chemicals that are used in a variety of household products, including stain repellants and waterproofing found in food containers, clothing, furniture, carpet and paint. Because of their widespread use, PFCs are also found in water, air, soil, plants, animals and humans. “PFCs are toxins that shouldn’t be in our bodies in the first place, but 98 percent of people tested have measurable levels of PFCs in their blood,” Sarah Knox, Ph.D., epidemiologist and professor in the Department of Community Medicine and lead author of the study, said. The study included 25,957 women ages 18-65 in eight water districts in the Parkersburg area. Researchers found a significant association between high PFC levels in the blood and an early onset of self-reported menopause as well as low estrogen levels. However, the causality is still unclear. “If the PFCs are causing early menopause, then those women are at an increased risk for heart issues. If they aren’t, there are still toxins accumulating in the body that shouldn’t be there,” Dr. Knox said. “Either way, it’s bad news.” The next step, Knox said, is to determine an estimated age of menopause and to conduct a population-based study to figure out the causality. In the meantime, Knox said there are things that people can do to reduce their exposure to PFCs: •    Have hardwood floors in the home instead of stain-resistant carpeting •    Wear all-cotton clothing; do not put children in flame-resistant clothing •    Make popcorn in an air popper instead of a microwave •    Microwave food in glass instead of plastic containers •    Use cast-iron cookware instead of non-stick coated cookware Other WVU researchers who participated in the study include: Alan Ducatman, M.D., Anoop Shankar, M.D., Ph.D., Stephanie Frisbee, Ph.D., and Beth Javins of the Department of Community Medicine and Timothy Jackson, M.D., of the Department of Medicine. The study, “Implications of Early Menopause in Women Exposed to Perfluorocarbons,” will appear in the June issue of the “Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism,” the world’s leading peer-reviewed journal for endocrine clinical research and cutting-edge clinical practice reviews. The abstract can be viewed online at http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/jc.2010-2401v1. For more information about perfluorocarbons from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, see www.epa.gov/opptintr/pfoa.   [...]

Bonnie’s Bus offers mammograms March 30 in Sissonville

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Kanawha County this month, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women.  A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at the Pocatalico Community Church in Sissonville from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 30.   The mammograms are billed to insurance, Medicaid or Medicare if available. Mammograms for women who do not have insurance will be covered by the West Virginia Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program or through a special grant from the Susan B. Komen for the Cure Foundation. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. For a Bonnie’s Bus appointment call Tonya at the Sissonville Health Center at 304-984-1585.  Last year, Bonnie’s Bus made 65 visits in 30 counties throughout West Virginia providing mammography screening to nearly 800 women. About half of those screened were medically underserved and from challenged socio-economic backgrounds and qualified for screening through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program. The goal for this year is to screen at least 1,200 women. Bonnie’s Bus works in collaboration with a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler's late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.wvucancer.org/bonnie.   Attention reporters and editors: If you are interested in covering Bonnie’s Bus when it visits your area, please call the HSC News Service in Morgantown at 304-293-7087 in advance. Out of respect for patient privacy, please do not show up at the location without scheduling an appropriate time for interviews and/or photos.   [...]

Bonnie’s Bus offers mammograms March 28 in Clarksburg

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Harrison County this month, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women.  A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at the Clarksburg Curves at the intersection of route 98 and Chestnut Street from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, March 28.   The mammograms are billed to insurance, Medicaid or Medicare if available. Mammograms for women who do not have insurance will be covered by the West Virginia Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program or through a special grant from the Susan B. Komen for the Cure Foundation. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. For a Bonnie’s Bus appointment call the Harrison-Clarksburg Health Departmentat 304-623-9308.  Last year, Bonnie’s Bus made 65 visits in 30 counties throughout West Virginia providing mammography screening to nearly 800 women. About half of those screened were medically underserved and from challenged socio-economic backgrounds and qualified for screening through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program. The goal for this year is to screen at least 1,200 women. Bonnie’s Bus works in collaboration with a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler's late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.wvucancer.org/bonnie.  Attention reporters and editors: If you are interested in covering Bonnie’s Bus when it visits your area, please call the HSC News Service in Morgantown at 304-293-7087 in advance. Out of respect for patient privacy, please do not show up at the location without scheduling an appropriate time for interviews and/or photos.   [...]

Protea and MBRCC announce cancer research collaboration

The following information was released by Protea Biosciences today: [...]

Bonnie’s Bus offers mammograms March 24 in Augusta

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Hampshire County this month, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women.  A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at the Hampshire County Health Department in Augusta from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 24.   The mammograms are billed to insurance, Medicaid or Medicare if available. Mammograms for women who do not have insurance will be covered by the West Virginia Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program or through a special grant from the Susan B. Komen for the Cure Foundation. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. For a Bonnie’s Bus appointment call the Hampshire County Health Department at 304-496-9640.  Last year, Bonnie’s Bus made 65 visits in 30 counties throughout West Virginia providing mammography screening to nearly 800 women. About half of those screened were medically underserved and from challenged socio-economic backgrounds and qualified for screening through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program. The goal for this year is to screen at least 1,200 women. Bonnie’s Bus works in collaboration with a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler's late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.wvucancer.org/bonnie.  Attention reporters and editors: If you are interested in covering Bonnie’s Bus when it visits your area, please call the HSC News Service in Morgantown at 304-293-7087 in advance. Out of respect for patient privacy, please do not show up at the location without scheduling an appropriate time for interviews and/or photos. [...]

Bonnie’s Bus offers mammograms March 23 in Paw Paw

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Morgan County this month, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women.  A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at the Mountaineer Community Health Center in Paw Paw from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, March 23.   The mammograms are billed to insurance, Medicaid or Medicare if available. Mammograms for women who do not have insurance will be covered by the West Virginia Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program or through a special grant from the Susan B. Komen for the Cure Foundation. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. For a Bonnie’s Bus appointment call the Mountaineer Community Health Center at 304-947-5500.  Last year, Bonnie’s Bus made 65 visits in 30 counties throughout West Virginia providing mammography screening to nearly 800 women. About half of those screened were medically underserved and from challenged socio-economic backgrounds and qualified for screening through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program. The goal for this year is to screen at least 1,200 women. Bonnie’s Bus works in collaboration with a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler's late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.wvucancer.org/bonnie.  Attention reporters and editors: If you are interested in covering Bonnie’s Bus when it visits your area, please call the HSC News Service in Morgantown at 304-293-7087 in advance. Out of respect for patient privacy, please do not show up at the location without scheduling an appropriate time for interviews and/or photos.   [...]

Match Day: WVU medical grads selected for residency training

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – For four years the 94 students in the West Virginia University School of Medicine Class of 2011 studied long hours and made great sacrifices to reach their goal to become physicians. Today, they anxiously watched the clock, knowing that at noon they would finally learn where they will go for the next phase of their training, known as residency. Medical students throughout the nation learned of their residency selections at noon on Thursday, March 17, at Match Day ceremonies. This year’s WVU celebrations were held simultaneously at the WVU Erickson Alumni Center in Morgantown, the Charleston Division Education building in Charleston and the Eastern Division’s Educational Building in Martinsburg.  Thirty-six percent of WVU School of Medicine Class of 2011 will continue training in the state. Sixty-nine percent of them will be either in West Virginia or a bordering state for their training. “We have seen more students choosing to stay in the state or nearby for the start of their residency training. That certainly shows the loyalty of our students to West Virginia and that they recognize our strong graduate training programs,” G. Anne Cather, M.D., associate dean of student services and professional development and professor of family medicine, said. “These are important statistics because research has shown that residents tend to establish their practices close to where they train. One-fourth of our non-resident students will be starting their residency training in West Virginia this July.” Forty-one percent of the graduates will train in internal medicine, pediatrics, family medicine or obstetrics/gynecology, fields that typically represent a person’s primary healthcare. Other popular fields this year were the specialties of psychiatry, emergency medicine and anesthesiology. “Our students matched in 19 different fields and will go to 19 different states,” Dr. Cather said. “This is a great day in the lives of all graduating medical students,” Arthur J. Ross, M.D., dean of the WVU School of Medicine, said. “In many respects it is even more memorable for them than their actual graduation ceremony. Today is the day when they learn where they will go, as ‘new doctors’ to further their education and training as they prepare for a life of service to humankind. We are extremely proud of all our students and are especially pleased to see that so many of them will remain in West Virginia; we expect that many more will return to West Virginia once they complete their training.” [...]

WVU Healthcare celebrates Certified Nurses Day

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – WVU Healthcare will celebrate Certified Nurses Day on March 19 by honoring more than 300 board-certified nurses for their professionalism, leadership and commitment to excellence in patient care. According to the American Nurses Credentialing Center, board certification is an important way to distinguish that a nurse has a met a level of distinction and knowledge indicating professional nursing practice. Board certification also gives the public some assurance that nurses must engage in lifelong learning to maintain and renew their certification and, in the case of advanced practice nurses, their authorization/licensure to practice. The public recognizes the significance of this achievement, and it provides some assurance that the individual who is caring for them has acquired a predetermined level of knowledge in the specialty area of practice. “Certified Nurses Day recognizes the motivation and self direction of all nurses who have obtained certification in their specialties. The board certification exam is very challenging, and passing it requires a high level of knowledge in one’s specialty,” Dottie Oakes, R.N., WVU Hospitals vice president and chief nursing executive, said. “We encourage all of our nurses to obtain board certification to increase their knowledge to provide quality patient care.” There are more than 50 nursing certification specialties, including medical-surgical, pediatric, pain management, cardiovascular, oncology, hospice, case management, emergency nursing, critical care and several others. Certified Nurses Day is held annually on March 19, which is the birthday of Margretta “Gretta” Madden Styles, R.N., Ed.D., a renowned expert of nurse credentialing.   [...]