WVU Medicine Cabinet News Stories

Bonnie’s Bus to offer mammograms in Keystone, Sophia and Peterstown

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit McDowell, Raleigh and Monroe counties this week, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women. A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be parked behind the Old Bank Building in Keystone from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, May 24. It will then head to the Municipal Parking Lot at 401 West Main St. in Sophia from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 25. On Thursday, May 26 and Friday, May 27, it will stop at the Monroe Health Center in Peterstown from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.   The mammograms are billed to insurance, Medicaid or Medicare if available. Mammograms for women who do not have insurance will be covered by the West Virginia Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program or through special grant funds. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. For a Bonnie’s Bus appointment in Keystone call the Tug River Clinic at 304-448-2101. For an appointment in Sophia call New River Health at Gulf Family Practice at 304-683-4304. For an appointment in Peterstown call the Monroe Health Center at 304-753-4336. [...]

WVU study finds DVD helps teens better understand sexually transmitted infections

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The methods used to teach teens about sexually transmitted infections (STI) could have a real impact on the amount of information retained, suggests a study led by Maria Merzouk, D.O., an obstetrician and gynecologist for WVU Healthcare and assistant professor in the WVU School of Medicine. [...]

WVU using video game to study stroke, nervous system trauma

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Motion capture in home gaming systems is being used every day in different and inventive ways, even to help people recover from injury and illness.  Valeriya Gritsenko, Ph.D., a recent addition to the West Virginia University Center for Neuroscience, is using motion capture in the XBOX Kinect to learn how the nervous system deals with damage that may be caused by a stroke or other nervous system related trauma. Motion capture is the process of recording movement and translating that movement on to a digital model. “For example, your arm is a very complex machine. It has many bones and many joints that are moving in different directions. There are many muscles that flex and extend the joints in multiple directions. The nervous system has to figure out what muscles to use and when to activate them,” Dr. Gritsenko said. “People who have had a stroke or any neural trauma have damaged some of these pathways. So, the idea is to use motion capture to understand these pathways, look at how they are damaged and how it can be worked around.” Tracking motion of rehabilitating patients while they are at home may reveal a lot about the speed and/or degree of total recovery. “I have collaborated with clinical faculty on a grant submission that deals with bringing motion capture into people’s homes,” Gritsenko said. “The XBOX Kinect sensor tracks the movement of the body. The idea is to use technology like that for rehabilitation to track people’s movements. For example, if they play games, we can track their recovery.” Currently in its preparation stages, Gritsenko’s XBOX research is scheduled to begin in June and will continue for at least a year. Participants are currently being recruited for the study.   [...]

WVU Children’s Hospital to host annual gala

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – They may be “easy like Sunday morning,” but the Commodores will be working hard on the night of Saturday, May 21 when they take to the stage at the West Virginia University Children’s Hospital Gala at the Morgantown Event Center at Waterfront Place. For the eighth annual black-tie event, guests will partake in “An Evening of Elegance,” which begins at 5:30 p.m. with a cocktail reception and silent auction. At 7 p.m., Richard Vaughan, M.D., professor and chair of the WVU Department of Surgery, will receive the WVU Children’s Hospital Award and the Friends of WVU Hospitals will receive the WVU Children’s Hospital Community Leader Award. Wyatt Smith, West Virginia’s 2011 Children’s Miracle Network Champion Child, will share his story about cystic fibrosis and the care he received at WVU Children’s Hospital. Following dinner at 7:30 p.m., guests will have the opportunity to participate in a live auction that features several big ticket items, including a Tuscan getaway, escape to Puerto Rico, instant wine cellar, a 12-month fine dining package, jewelry and an autographed Taylor Swift guitar. The Soul Train Dancers will take the stage at 9:30 p.m. followed by the Commodores at 10 p.m. The Grammy Award-winning band will perform some of its greatest hits, including “Easy,” “Just to Be Close to You” and “Brickhouse.” “This is our largest fundraiser in terms of the number of people involved and money raised for a single event. We are so grateful that we have such an amazing network of supporters who come out year after year to make this event a success,” Cheryl Jones, R.N., director of WVU Children’s Hospital, said. “The money raised from this event supports our programs and allows us to buy the equipment we need to provide cutting-edge care to every child who walks through our doors.” This year’s gala is open to the public. Those interested in attending can purchase tickets online at www.wvuchgala.com or by contacting Andrea Parsons, WVU Children’s Hospital development officer, at 304-598-4346 ext. 5 or parsonsa@wvuhealthcare.com.   [...]

WVU to celebrate 50 years of accredited graduate medical education

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – In 1961, the West Virginia University School of Medicine received accreditation for four Graduate Medical Education (GME) programs: Surgery, Anesthesiology, Pediatrics and Internal Medicine. This month, WVU is celebrating 50 years of accredited GME with a system that now includes more than 50 specialties and 385 residents. “What started as accredited GME in 1961 when the University hospital opened its doors has grown substantially. We have become the largest sponsor of graduate medical education in West Virginia, offering more than 50 specialties – half of which are the only training program in the state,” Norman Ferrari, M.D., senior associate dean for medical education, said. “This links to our mission of serving West Virginians and providing them with a variety of specialists to meet their complex healthcare needs. We are really proud to be of such great service to the state.” Currently, WVU School of Medicine faculty members supervise residency programs at six West Virginia hospitals. Thirty-eight of those are in specialties for which Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accreditation is possible, and all are fully accredited. In addition to the programs at WVU Hospitals in Morgantown, WVU sponsors training for physicians at City Hospital in Martinsburg, Jefferson Memorial Hospital in Ranson and the Veterans Administration Medical Centers in Clarksburg and Martinsburg. In Charleston, WVU faculty physicians supervise training of residents in programs sponsored by Charleston Area Medical Center. The largest programs are in Internal Medicine and Psychiatry. The Emergency Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Neurosurgery, Neurology, and Ophthalmology programs are among those at WVU that are the only ones of their kind in the state. “This milestone is well worth celebrating. We are here for West Virginians, and one of the best ways that we can fulfill our commitment to improve their health and wellness is through our GME programs,” Arthur J. Ross III, M.D., M.B.A., dean of the WVU School of Medicine, said. “I am ever grateful to the many individuals who work hard every day to see that our GME programs are as strong and successful as possible.” To celebrate 50 years, the Office of Graduate Medical Education has four days of events planned for GME Week 2011 at the WVU Health Sciences Center. The week kicks off at noon on May 17 with a box lunch in the Okey Patteson Auditorium. On May 18, podium research presentations will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Fukushima Auditorium. GME program directors and coordinators will meet from noon to 5 p.m. on May 19 in Room 1909 for educational development sessions. A coffee station grab-n-go will be set up from 7 to 9 a.m. on May 20 in the John E. Jones Conference Center. In addition to GME Week, the Department of Anesthesiology will hold a special celebration luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on May 26 in the John E. Jones Conference Center.   [...]

Bonnie’s Bus to offer mammograms in Rowlesburg and Fairmont

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Preston and Marion counties next week, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women. A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at the Rowlesburg Clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday, May 19, and it will participate in the Marion County Health Fair at Middletown Mall in Fairmont from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, May 20.   The mammograms are billed to insurance, Medicaid or Medicare if available. Mammograms for women who do not have insurance will be covered by the West Virginia Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program or through special grant funds. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. For an appointment at the Rowlesburg Clinic call 304-454-2421, and for an appointment at the health fair call Marion County Health Care at 304-367-7543.   Last year, Bonnie’s Bus made 65 visits in 30 counties throughout West Virginia providing mammography screening to nearly 800 women. About half of those screened were medically underserved and from challenged socio-economic backgrounds and qualified for screening through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program. The goal for this year is to screen at least 1,200 women. Bonnie’s Bus works in collaboration with a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler’s late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.wvucancer.org/bonnie.  Attention reporters and editors: If you are interested in covering Bonnie’s Bus when it visits your area, please call the HSC News Service in Morgantown at 304-293-7087 in advance. Out of respect for patient privacy, please do not show up at the location without scheduling an appropriate time for interviews and/or photos. [...]

Bonnie’s Bus to offer mammograms in Matewan

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Bonnie’s Bus, a digital mammography center on wheels, will visit Mingo County next week, offering digital mammograms and breast care education to women. A service of WVU Healthcare, Bonnie’s Bus will be at the Head Start located at 3085 McCoy Alley in Matewan from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, May 17. The mammograms are billed to insurance, Medicaid or Medicare if available. Mammograms for women who do not have insurance will be covered by the West Virginia Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program or through special grant funds. A physician’s order is needed for a mammogram. For a Bonnie’s Bus appointment call the Mingo County Health Department at 304-235-3570. Last year, Bonnie’s Bus made 65 visits in 30 counties throughout West Virginia providing mammography screening to nearly 800 women. About half of those screened were medically underserved and from challenged socio-economic backgrounds and qualified for screening through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program. The goal for this year is to screen at least 1,200 women. Bonnie’s Bus works in collaboration with a statewide partnership of women’s groups, clinicians, public health professionals and other community leaders working to help reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer in West Virginia. Coalfield Community Action Partnership is sponsoring the Bus visit to Matewan. Made possible by a generous gift from West Virginia natives Jo and Ben Statler to WVU’s Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Bonnie’s Bus is operated by WVU Hospitals. The bus is named after Mrs. Statler’s late mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson. For information on Bonnie’s Bus, see www.wvucancer.org/bonnie. Attention reporters and editors: If you are interested in covering Bonnie’s Bus when it visits your area, please call the HSC News Service in Morgantown at 304-293-7087 in advance. Out of respect for patient privacy, please do not show up at the location without scheduling an appropriate time for interviews and/or photos. [...]

More than 700 Health Sciences students honored

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The achievements of 704 new West Virginia University Health Sciences graduates will be celebrated over a weekend of activities marking WVU’s 142nd Commencement. The WVU Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy will honor their respective grads at ceremonies May 14 and 15. Receptions for graduates and their families will follow each event. Two visiting leaders from Oman Medical College (OMC) will attend Saturday’s School of Medicine ceremony. As founder of OMC, Dr. P. Mohamed Ali is a member of the school’s Board of Directors and Governing Council. Dr. Saleh Al Kusaibi is dean of OMC. Oman Medical College has operated in academic partnership with the WVU School of Medicine and School of Pharmacy since 2001. The schedule of Health Sciences ceremonies is as follows: Saturday, May 14 8:30 a.m. -- School of Medicine (M.D., Ph.D. programs), Creative Arts Center The School of Medicine will award 93 Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) diplomas and Doctor of Medicine/Doctor of Philosophy (M.D./Ph.D.) degrees. [...]

WVU Children’s Hospital patient to represent state as Children’s Miracle Network Champion Child

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Shortly after Carolyn Smith gave birth to her son, Wyatt, she knew something was wrong. Though he ate regularly, he was losing weight and starving. At six-weeks-old, Wyatt was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (CF). His doctors in Parkersburg sent him to West Virginia University Children’s Hospital for the special care kids with CF need. Now 15, Wyatt will represent West Virginia and join other child ambassadors from every state as a part of the Children’s Miracle Network Champions Across America presented by Walmart and Sam’s Club. The program brings attention to the work of children’s hospitals by honoring remarkable children who have overcome severe medical challenges. Wyatt spends a good part of his mornings taking medication and treating his CF. After sleeping with a feeding tube all night, he wakes up to take a handful of medication and put on a vest that shakes loose the secretions that build up in his lungs. “It’s part of the burden of cystic fibrosis; it’s mainly a digestive and lung and sinus disease, but it really is a whole body disease,” Kathy Moffett, M.D., director of WVU’s Mountain State Cystic Fibrosis Center, said. “And yet you look at Wyatt, and Wyatt doesn’t look at life and say how unfair is this. Wyatt looks at life and he wakes up with a smile on his face.” From Wyatt’s perspective, he just wants to be treated like a normal teenager. “I want people to know CF isn’t a bad disease like everyone thinks it is,” he said. “You can go every day knowing you have it, and you can still live a normal life.” Wyatt was introduced as West Virginia’s 2011 Champion Child today (May 12) at the Walmart Supercenter Store (#1782) in Vienna. This October, Wyatt and his fellow champions will visit the White House and Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., and will attend the Children’s Miracle Network Celebration event at Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Fla. For one week, they’ll meet with members of Congress and celebrities, visit the Disney parks and share their stories of medical victory. Since 1987, Children’s Miracle Network and Walmart have worked together to help children by raising money for children’s hospitals. Walmart and Sam’s Club employees, customers and members have raised and contributed more than $500 million for children’s hospitals. WVU Children’s Hospital is the only Children’s Miracle Network hospital in West Virginia. Each year, WVU Children’s Hospital provides care to more than 7,000 newborns and children, who come from every county in West Virginia and also from Pennsylvania, Maryland and Ohio. On average, 1,600 babies are born annually at WVU Children’s Hospital. Almost three-quarters of the deliveries are high-risk. WVU Children’s Hospital physicians provide care for children at the hospital in Morgantown and at clinics throughout the state. For more information on WVU Children’s Hospital, see www.wvukids.com.   [...]