Greatest Needs

Image of a child with mother and physician.WVU Medicine Children’s is the only place for comprehensive care for children and women in West Virginia – and our patient volumes continue to increase. We have identified four areas where our growth is most critical:

Pediatric cancer care and treatment

Fact:

The pediatric cancer mortality rate in West Virginia is higher than the national average and higher than bordering states. We must continue to do all we can to change those statistics.

Currently:

WVU Medicine Children's hematology and oncology department treats malignant and non-malignant diseases, including anemia, sickle cell disease, lymphoma, and leukemia. We see an increasing number of pediatric cancer patients of all ages each year, some just a few months old.

New funding:

It will provide us with upgraded, expanded facilities, new technologies and equipment, new support programs, and additional providers to strengthen our fight against pediatric cancer.

Pediatric mental and behavioral health

Fact:

West Virginia and the nation face epidemic crises in pediatric mental and behavioral health, including pediatric substance abuse.

Currently:

Through innovative treatments, therapies, and research, WVU Medicine Children’s supports patients and families who struggle with autism, spectrum disorders, delayed reading, behavioral and emotional disturbances, and substance abuse and addiction. We have been working hard to keep up with this demand.

New funding:

It will provide a dedicated inpatient unit for the most severely affected patients, and funds to recruit additional faculty and staff to meet this unprecedented demand.

Faculty recruitment

Fact:

Providing high quality, advanced care comes with the need to continually evolve. This includes attracting and staffing WVU Medicine Children’s with expert physicians across our many sub-specialty programs, including Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Cardiology, Cystic Fibrosis, Gastroenterology, Metabolic Medicine, Neurology/Neurosurgery, Orthopaedics, Pulmonology, and Urology. This means supporting endowed positions, which are pivotal in the recruitment of new faculty to WVU Medicine Children’s.

Currently:

We have only one endowed pediatric, obstetric, and gynecological faculty position and are in need of at least six more to attract and retain specialists dedicated to changing the future of prevention and care.

New funding:

It will allow us to endow chairs and provide support in three pediatric subspecialty areas, where needs are most pressing: Gastroenterology, Neurology, and Pulmonology. These chairs will be a powerful recruitment tool and, combined with additional support for new faculty, will attract talent who will deliver the highest level of healthcare available anywhere, helping our kids to be healthier and stay out of the hospital. Other areas where funding will make a vital impact is in the recruitment of additional specialists in Maternal-Fetal Medicine (the care of high-risk mothers and newborns) and Gynecologic Oncology (cancer care for women).

Statewide program for children’s health

Fact:

WVU Medicine Children’s serves all 55 counties throughout West Virginia.

Currently:

Patients in some parts of West Virginia leave the state for care when they could receive care at WVU Medicine Children’s. A unified statewide program for children’s health in West Virginia is being developed to bring synergy between episodic healthcare and preventive care, leading to a healthier population.

New funding:

It will allow us to promote our working relationship with providers across the state through the newly formed, statewide West Virginia Children’s Hospital Collaborative, leading to the ability to form a true health network for West Virginia’s women, children, and families. Further, within the WVU Medicine system, we are creating a way for mothers and babies to stay close to home while benefitting from the high quality care offered at WVU Medicine Children's.